Paper Presenter FAQs

To help guide you through the paper presenting process and to create a more valuable experience, please find below a few of our most frequently asked questions.

faqs

  1. When will I know if my paper has been accepted for presentation at the conference?
  2. Do I have to attend the AEJMC conference if my paper is accepted?
  3. How will I know what my presentation time slot is at the conference?
  4. How do I get my paper to my moderator and/or discussant?
  5. My Paper Chair has told me that I will be in a Poster Session (Scholar-to-Scholar Session) or a High Density Session to present my paper. What is that?
  6. Does AEJMC provide the materials for my presentation?
  7. As a presenter, who pays for my AEJMC conference expenses?
  8. I will be participating in a Paper Presentation session. What is that?

 

If you should have a question not answered below, please Email your question to Felicia Greenlee Brown with “AEJMC Paper Presenter Question” in the subject line.

 

1. When will I know if my paper has been accepted for presentation at the conference?

If your paper has been accepted for presentation at the AEJMC conference, your division or interest group Paper Chair should notify you of your paper status by May 15. If your paper has been accepted, you will then receive copies of the hotel and conference registration forms from your Paper Chair. Questions about paper acceptance must be directed to your Paper Chair. The AEJMC Central Office may not have this information available until July — when it is printed in the association newsletter. The Central Office will not be able to answer questions about papers that were not accepted for the conference. Contact your Paper Chair with all related questions.

2. Do I have to attend the AEJMC conference if my paper is accepted?

Yes. If your paper is accepted, at least one of your paper’s authors must attend the conference. If there isn’t anyone available to present the paper at the conference, then the paper must be withdrawn. You should contact your Paper Chair about withdrawing papers from the conference before the end of May. Graduate Students unable to attend may get any faculty member to present a paper on their behalf.

3. How will I know what my presentation time slot is at the conference?

Your Paper Chair will tell you the day and time of your paper presentation at the conference. When you are given your conference program onsite, you may search the name index (in the back of the Program) to find out where you will be presenting the paper at the Convention.

4. How do I get my paper to my moderator and/or discussant?

You are responsible for sending your paper to your moderator and/or discussant prior to the conference. Should you need contact information for your moderator/discussant, please contact Janet Harley.

5. My Paper Chair has told me that I will be in a Poster Session (Scholar-to-Scholar Session) or a High Density Session to present my paper. What is that?

There are three types of sessions for paper presentation. Your Paper Chair will tell you the type of session for your presentation. You will be informed of this some time in May. You may be selected to present your paper in a REGULAR SESSION. Learn about a the other two types of special sessions by clicking on the session names below:

6. Does AEJMC provide the materials for my presentation?

No. Each presenter is responsible for purchasing and bringing their own materials (such as the material to go on the scholar-to-scholar bulletin board, push pins, transparencies etc.) for their paper presentations.

7. As a presenter, who pays for my AEJMC conference expenses?

Generally, the expenses for attending the conference (including conference registration fees, hotel fees, food and travel) are the presenter’s responsibility.

*Non-member conference registration fees include AEJMC membership for one year.

8. I will be participating in a Paper Presentation session. What is that?

The Paper Session format is similar to panel sessions. The presentations should concisely report the results of personal research efforts. Presenters should demonstrate skill in communicating to the audience the research problem, the approach to solving the problem, and the research results.

Timing:
Oral presentation of research should not exceed 10 minutes. A session moderator will aid the presenter in maintaining this schedule and in fielding questions from the audience. Following the presentation, the session moderator will ask for audience questions. The moderator may entertain questions while the exchange appears interesting and relevant. The speaker should repeat a question before answering so the audience may understand the entire dialogue.

Suggestions to Prepare for the Oral Presentations:
Remember, you are the expert. No one in the audience knows as much about your research as you. Therefore, remember to explain your research in enough detail so the audience will understand what you did, how you did it, and what you learned.

Whenever possible, avoid jargon or unnecessary terminology. If it is essential to use specialized terms, remember to explain the specialized terms briefly. Give your audience enough time to understand what you are trying to convey.

Graphs, tables and other representation help explain your results. Keep them simple and uncluttered. Focus on important information; for example, remember to name the variables on both axes of a graph, and state the significance of the position and shape of the graph line.

Deliver your presentation at a comfortable pace:
It helps to practice your presentation before a non-specialized audience. Practice will help perfect the presentation and the timing. Do listen to the advice of your non-specialized audience but also get help from a teacher or other advisors as needed.

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